Guest Post: Have Your Best Run Yet!

I love Clever Training (send me an email to get a code for 10% off!) and buy lots of my training gear from them. Many people know about their awesome selection of running, triathlon, and training gear, but most people don’t know that Clever Training also hosts a great blog with training tips, fun stories, and information about the latest gear. When Ron, the CT Blog guy reached out to me about doing a guest post, I was super excited. I love reading the CT Blog and thought that you would, too. Here’s his post, a set of great tips for having your best run yet. Thanks, Ron!

Have Your Best Run Yet

Any dedicated runner knows that the key to having an amazing run depends on many factors. Perhaps most importantly, it starts with your mentality. Here are a few ways that you can pump yourself up and prepare yourself for your best run yet:

Recognize Negative Thinking

Many runners know that the body can be perfectly capable, but if the mind is not thinking positively, it can have a huge impact on the quality of your run. The trick is to recognize negative thoughts and remember that you have control over them. When a negative thought wanders through your mind, call upon a cue word or song that replaces the negativity with something positive. Focus on the pumping of your arms or your breathing, and you might be surprised at how much easier your run becomes.

Wear the Right Gear

Those shoes you bought for 20 dollars may have been a steal, but you aren’t doing your feet any favors. In order to keep your feet going for long distances, you will need to spend a little more to find the right shoe that is properly insulated. In addition, consider switching from cotton shirts and shorts to moisture-wicking workout clothes. This will help keep the sweat from sticking to your body and turning cold quickly. Having the right workout gear for your runs will allow you to go further distances in comfort.

Learn Proper Breathing

Many long-distance runners make the mistake of breathing too much. This deprives your lungs of oxygen because you are not getting all of the CO2 out of your lungs. Your lungs need oxygen to power you through those distances, so slowing down your breathing will relax you and fully give your lungs the oxygen they need, making running slightly easier. If you get a stitch in your side, matching your stride to your breath will help ease the pain.

Stop Setting Rigid Goals

Setting goals can be good for running, but if your goals are too rigid, then it can fill your mind with a defeatist attitude when you know you are failing to hit that goal. If this happens, don’t focus on the failure to meet your goal. Instead, have back-up goals. For instance, if you set a goal to run nine miles and know that you won’t make it by mile four, set a mini-goal of reaching eight miles instead. Change your self-talk be more positive, and it will help keep you motivated rather than having you want to give up in frustration.

Use Others as Motivation, Not Comparison

Theodore Roosevelt once said that “comparison is the thief of joy,” and this is true in the running world. There is always going to be someone faster than you or who can go longer distances, and this is something that everyone should accept. Instead of getting down about this, use that person as a source of motivation for your next run. Acknowledge that you are only competing against yourself, and that’s all that matters for your enjoyment.

It’s Not a Priority

A few weeks ago, one of my friends posted the “it’s not a priority” quote to her Facebook page. You’ve probably seen it. I know it wasn’t the first time I saw it floating around on the internet. It’s made the rounds of Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, you name it.

Priorities

Every other time I saw it, I clicked on by. But this time, I stopped. I’d been feeling frantic and overwhelmed, with too many things on my to-do list and too little time. Of course, too little time is an illusion. I know that, but it doesn’t feel that way when you have 200 things on your needed-to-be-done-yesterday list and are wearing your last pair of clean undies. So I stopped. I decided that I would try it. For one week, I would keep track of all the things that I supposedly didn’t have time to do. I kept a little log in my notes app.

Three days in, I was horrified. Here are some of the things I wrote:

It isn’t a priority to eat lunch. [because I don’t need to eat?]

It isn’t a priority to turn in that report on time. [start employee here]

It isn’t a priority to shower before work. [because I’m too tired to get up on time.]

It isn’t a priority to go to the bathroom. [yikes]

Not eating came up more than once. So did not showering. And not sleeping enough. After just a few days, it was clear that I wasn’t making self care a priority. Sure, I was sticking to my workout schedule and keeping up my fitness. I was doing what I needed to do for work. But, I hadn’t really sat down in days. I wasn’t eating on schedule. In short, my day to day behaviors didn’t match my values. So I made some changes. I cut back on a few obligations, left committees I’d outgrown, and turned down several opportunities. It feels better. I am making a commitment to myself to live in line with my values and it starts with how I manage my time.

 

Race Review: Detroit Free Press Marathon

Last week, my brother and I ran the Detroit Free Press/Talmer Bank Marathon. We had a great time! I paced the marathon for MarathonPacing.com and he ran his first marathon as a father. Here’s his take on the fun:

Detroit International Marathon Review

Last weekend, I completed my second marathon; once again running with Dr. Rachel.  A few months back,we had signed up to run the Detroit (International) Marathon – it seemed like a good idea at the time.

The Expo

While Dr. Rachel worked a shift at the Pacer Booth, I had plenty of time to explore the expo.  The expo was pretty straight forward and the check in was well organized and fast.  I only waited a few moments before receiving my bib and gear check bag, which was very nice.  I spent the rest of the time wandering the different booths and scooping up bargains on new gear that I had been looking at for a couple weeks.  The highlight was the official marathon gear – the t-shirts, hoodies, and knit caps were fantastic.  Each came in a variety of colors to represent local professional and collegiate sports teams.  I spent more than I had intended but was happy.  The very end of the Expo had a massive TV wall showing a virtual tour of the race course.  I appreciated the chance to see the course before running it and got to meet some of the people behind Run Detroit.

The Race

It was cold.  Snow fell.

We showed up a bit early to the race to get into our corral and wait for the start gun; most people had the good sense to wait to the last moment to line up in order to stay warmer.  The corrals almost seemed more a suggestion than an absolute as people simply milled about and even some spectators were in the corral area.  While a little confusing, this really did not cause an issue and within 20 min of the first wave we were released for the long run ahead.

The start of the race was great and a lot of spectators had braved the cold to cheer on the runners as we made our way along the streets of Detroit.  Fairly early on, we came to the Ambassador Bridge and the first major uphill I had run in probably a year.  The pace slowed and the course narrowed making things a little compact for my liking but running across the bridge and into Canada was awesome.

Detroit Marathon Ambassador Bridge

As we crossed into Canada, we were greeted by cheering fans and clever signs.  Before the race, I had been told the Canadian fans were great and they really were – best sign: “Only one more country to go!”.  After a few miles in Canada, we took the tunnel back to Michigan.  Described as the world’s only underwater mile, the tunnel was a good change of pace and fun.

The rest of the course works its way through Detroit and across Belle Isle.  The International Half had started with the Full marathon and at mile 12.5 or so they split.  It was incredibly odd to go from running in a crowd to being one of ten people on the road.  Based on the race results, we had started with roughly 15,500 people but at the split only 3800 marathoners remained.  After running alone (I had fallen off pace and was left behind as Dr. Rachel continued on for her perfect pacing) for some time, the US only half marathoners started to catch up as we hit Belle Isle.  Belle Isle was tough, but this was mile 20-22.  Exhaustion was setting in, the pavement was tough, and the wind had picked up making the two mile stretch a real challenge.

The course finished along the Riverwalk area and was very nice.  After a few more bends, it was back to the combined start/finish line and a new full marathon PR (5:22)!  The post-race snack selection was not great but they had Mylar blankets and water ready for everyone handed out by smiling and happy volunteers.  I hadn’t mentioned them until now but the marathon volunteers were great.  This was a cold and cloudy day, but I did not pass a single person who seemed anything other than excited to be there to cheer on the runners.  These volunteers manned 18 water stations on the course meaning there was no need to carry a water bottle which was fantastic.

While the race was tough and I did not make my pace goal, I had a great time running Detroit.

Detroit Marathon Medal

The only thing better was the post-race Coney dog and fountain Vernor’s ginger ale.

Brother on the Run: All the Carbs!

Here’s the latest from the Brother on the Run – he’s training for a marathon and it’s getting serious. His mileage is increasing and he’s hungry. Really hungry. I know all runners can relate.

 

I was told that I looked absolutely panicked when the server tried to take the bread plate from the table.

Sitting at the wedding table with my young daughter, I had not had a chance to grab a roll before dinner.  The rest of the table thought is hilarious as I could only stare in horror as the bread left the table.  I had run 18 miles that morning; I needed some carbs.  Thankfully, the server was only taking the platter to refill it.  When it returned, I grab two rolls and more butter than any one person needed.  Did I mention the running yet?

The sad truth of my weekend was a very long run before a wedding out of state that we almost didn’t make.  As sad as it sounds, the need to get my miles in ahead of the upcoming Detroit Marathon put me into a panic on planning this trip.  The wedding was out of state, which means a long drive and an unfamiliar environment for running.  With a run of 16 to 18 miles planned (required) on Saturday, I had struggled to think of a way to fit everything in.  The easiest action would have been to miss the wedding.  Stop for a moment and consider how sad this idea is – skipping a wedding to get in a run?

Something in me had to be broken.  Miss the wedding for running.  That would be the worst excuse ever to miss a wedding.  Worst.  Ever.

Luckily for me, my wife talked some sense into me and we planned to drive to the wedding on a Friday so I could get my run in on Saturday morning.  In the week leading up to the wedding, I started looking online for running path and trails near the event.  I finally settled on the Prairie-Duneland trail out of Chesterton, IN.  As a part of the Rail-to-Trails movement, the path was paved and 10 miles from end to end with other connecting trails.   The trail was well enough maintained and wide enough for both bikers and runners to pass through.  There were numerous pavilions and frequent enough restrooms.  The biggest issue was crossing roads – many of these interchanges would have high brush that made it hard to note cars and trucks.  Thankfully, I missed the train crossing by about two minutes but that had carried a worry going into the back stretch.

The run went well enough except for losing track of the mileage and going out father than I intended.  I ended up missing meeting a friend for lunch but was able to get my run accomplished.  The wedding was wonderful and thankfully, the infant gave me a convenient excuse to skip dancing and leave early.  My legs were shot and there was no way I was staying up to shut down the event.  I had a recovery run in the morning to start planning.

Review: Bulu Box (and coupon code!)

Sometimes, being a fitness blogger has some awesome perks. Recently, I was asked by the cool folks over at Bulu Box to try a sample box, and review it for the blog. I was delighted to have been asked, as I had heard of Bulu Box and had been interested in trying one. This was the perfect arrangement. I was provided one box to review.

Bulu Box is like many other subscription “box” services. Each month, the people at Bulu Box send you a box full of sample sized goodies to try. Bulu Box is the first health, nutrition and weight loss box. Each month, subscribers get a custom box filled with a new mix of 4 to 5 premium samples from top brands to try. Every sample is sufficient enough to decide if the product is right for you and there is a wide variety of products included in each box.

Here’s how it works: You sign up, filling out a profile of interests. Each month, Bulu Box sends you a box full of goodies. You try the goodies. Each month you can earn up to 100 Rewards Points ($10!) just for subscribing and sharing your thoughts via their online review system. Log in to your account to fill out your sample surveys about the products you tried to earn points. At any time, you can use cash or points to purchase full-size versions of the items you like.

I got my first box about two weeks ago. There were so many goodies in the box that it actually took me these whole two weeks to try everything – which is awesome.

Bulu Box

First, the Bulu Box is cool. My box was bright red and covered in inspirational quotes. I loved seeing it in the mailbox and spent a few minutes reading and enjoying the packaging. Seriously.

When I opened my box, I found it was full of awesome products to try. In fact, I used three of the products that very moment!

Bulu Box contents

I got chicken jerky, tea, vitamins, sport jellies, and an itch soothing cream. I made my tea, ate some jerky, and smoothed some cream on a huge mosquito bite within five minutes of opening the box. I was very impressed with not only the quality of the products, but the range of products included in my box. Each product was oriented toward a healthy lifestyle, but each was diverse. I liked that my box included food, tea, a product to use while exercising, and a skin cream.

The box was packaged nicely and the inserted pamphlets had more information about various products. Each product sample was sufficient to determine if I liked the product. I am still using the skin cream and I’ve had it for weeks. Confession: I ate all the jerky in one sitting (it was good).

Overall, I enjoyed my Bulu Box and will be heading over to their website to get my self some more of that jerky. I enjoyed sampling new products and think that Bulu Box is a wonderful addition to the bevy of sample box subscription services.

Interested in trying Bulu Box yourself? Use discount code SWEATPINK for 50% off a 3-month subscription to BuluBox. Happy sampling!!

How To: Race in Multiple Races

Back when I first started running, everyone I knew was training for one event. We would pick a race – a 10k, a half, a full, and train for that one race. We would build our training program around the race, run it, and then enjoy the feeling of accomplishment. Lately, more and more people are choosing to run in back-to-back races. Some run multiple events in one day, or one weekend. Others have been planning seasons that include three or more events in a series. I’ve tried running in multiple events and I love it! I have run in Tampa’s Gasparilla Distance Classic several times – with four races in two days. I’ve run in Disney’s popular Goofy and Dopey race series, with 39.3 or 48.6 miles across multiple races. This fall, for the second year in a row, I will run four marathons in four weeks. This type of multiple event racing isn’t for everyone, but, if you’d like to give it a try, here are my top tips for multiple event racing success:

  • Plan your season around the events as a whole, rather than around one event. For example, this fall I will run four marathons in four weeks. My goal is to run four marathons in four weeks, not to run one marathon well, with a few extra after that. Planning to run only one marathon, then running four sets me up for disappointment, fatigue, and injury. Plan a training season around your goal – which is multiple events in the season.
  • When running in multiple events, you simply can’t train the way you do for a single event. your base fitness has to reflect the nature of your challenge. When building your base, build a base fitness that will prepare you well for the challenge at hand. This means I need to run high mileage multiple weeks in a row to prepare for my four marathons in four weeks extravaganza. Doing Dopey? Plan to run long runs back to back most weeks, with three to four consecutive days of running. Match the training to the specific challenges of your goal.
  • Let your body be your guide. When you’re striving for a new goal, it can be temping to push through aches and pains. Treat the body well, and listen to its cues. Achieving a multiple event goal requires a healthy, fit body.
  • Find a cross training activity that you enjoy. Engage in it often to prevent burn out and to recovery from bouts of hard running.
  • When you have multiple events in one day, practice running twice in one day. Learn how your body responds to multiple events and work on a rest/fueling/hydrating plan that mimics the specifics of your goal events.
  • When you have multiple events across multiple weeks, every event before the last is part of the training for the last event. Plan paces and race strategy accordingly. Remember that every event you run is preparation for the next, so a tough day or a poor performance is just part of the training process.
  • Learn to recover well and practice recovery throughout the training. Develop recovery strategies that suit you and will work within your goal time frame. Develop a long and short term view on recovery. Think of recovery not just as something done in the days or weeks after and event, but something done in minutes and hours after each event. What you do in the first few minutes after racing, and in the next several hours, can make a big difference. Develop a daily routine for recovery and wellness.  Practice season-long recovery strategies, too, including such as massage, foam rolling, and other body work. The quality of your next race depends on your ability to recover as well as you can in the time that you have before the event.
  • The goal after your first event is to be recovered enough to race again. When races are very close (hours to days), accept that some fatigue will be part of every event after the first. When you have a week between events, use that week to recover, rest, and prepare the body to race again. As the time between events becomes longer, expand the rest/recovery time and start to add in easy-paced running. Use the time between events to maintain the fitness you have, not to train.

Dopey

Racing multiple events can be exhilarating and can add a new challenge to the racing season for even the most accomplished runners. When planning carefully, runners can have great success (and a lot of fun!) running multiple events. Need help planning your multiple event calendar? Consider hiring a running coach. More information on training with Dr. Rachel Runs can be found above, in the Coaching tab.

Race Review: Peaks Island 5 Miler

Last weekend, a running friend and I went on a great running getaway! We built a little escape around the Peaks Island 5 Mile Race, a race held on a tiny island in Maine. We planned to drive up to Maine, stay near Freeport, then run the race and enjoy some time on the island. Our planning hit a little block, though, when it came to the race. There was precious little information available about the race and the logistics of the race. Luckily, we are an easygoing pair, so we were able to adapt. This review is going to be some review, and some information sharing. I hope that sharing my experience will help others who might encounter similar confusion.

First, you’ll need to take a ferry over from Portland for the race. There is parking right at the Casco Bay Lines terminal, but it’s significantly more expensive than local parking lots. Find a parking lot that offers all day parking for a flat rate. We did, and walked two short blocks to the terminal.

Cacso Bay Lines

Runners do need to pay for passage on the ferry, less than $10 each (and getting off the island is free). You’ll get tickets at the terminal, then wait in a little lobby for the ferry. We took the 8:30am ferry, a special ferry for the race. It would have been fine to take a later ferry, but we wanted some time to look around. The race starts at 10:30, so a 9:15 ferry would be fine. The ferry ride was lovely, breezy and full of gorgeous views. It lasted about 20 minutes.

Casco Ferry

We got to the race location, a local Lions Club. The Lions Club has a large, grassy area, and a small building with bathrooms and a stage. Packed pick up was efficient, with three staff to assist about 10 runners. We easily got our numbers and then explored. There is no gear check, but people bring their stuff and leave it on the Lions Club property. We saw people with coolers, blankets, and many belongings. No one seemed to mind leaving their things, so we did, too. The picnic table spots went early, but many people sat on the grass or brought their own chairs. It’s worth note that the website says no dogs are allowed, but we saw many people with dogs and dogs are welcomed on the ferry.

Peaks Island Lions Club

A short kids’ race immediately preceded the 5 mile race, so we watched the kid and warmed up. We took in the gorgeous bay views and generally had a great time before our 5 mile race started.

Casco Bay View

The Peaks Island 5 Mile Race course runs around the island itself. It includes lovely sea views, a section through a woodsy area, and several miles through neighborhoods on the island. The course map wasn’t available before the race, save for this little picture at the Lions Club, so the whole race was an adventure. I didn’t know what to expect, but was treated to classic Maine.

Peaks Island Road Race Course Map

Peaks Island Road Race Course Map

The organizers, the Maine Track Club, say that the race is flat, but it’s really more New England flat with just a bit of variation.

Peaks Island 5 Mile Race Elevation

Peaks Island 5 Mile Race Elevation

Overall, the course was nicely laid out, well marked, and mostly free of traffic despite the roads being open. The finish line was no-fuss, with just a small table and timing mats. Immediately after the race, finishers were treated to a cook out (extra charge, purchased ahead of time). Runners made advance purchase of tickets to the cook out and were able to enjoy lobster, chicken, or vegetarian meal options. We got the chicken, which was par-boiled, then soaked in BBQ sauce and grilled.

IMG_0024 IMG_0025 IMG_0026

Awards were given out to top finishers. It was a speedy race, with lots of fast times. Following the race, my friend and I toured the island and enjoyed the small stretch of sandy beach for beach glass hunting.

Peaks Island

Overall, we had a lovely time at the Peaks Island 5 Mile Race. The communication before the event was lacking and the website was nonexistent, but the race itself was well done, well organized, and a great family event. I would recommend this race as a fun destination race for a weekend getaway. We will be back!

To Be a Running Coach

I’ve been a RRCA certified running coach for several years. I truly enjoy coaching and helping runners achieve their goals. If you’ve been thinking about hiring a running coach, do it! Coaches can help athletes of all levels achieve goals, stay accountable to a training program, and inspire you to believe in yourself. Still need convincing? Check out my post on reasons to hire a running coach.

This weekend, as part of another role in my life, I sat in on a running coaching class. Doing so as a certified, and experienced coach, has been an interesting experience. I have a few observations.

 

First, there are many types of coaches. I think many people assume that a running coach is a running coach. One of the keys to a positive coaching experience is having a strong goodness of fit between you and your coach. This refers not just to personality, but to training philosophy and beliefs about running. Most of the coaches-in-training talked about their running philosophy – everything from how much cross training to include to how long the optimal long run before a marathon should be. There was some overlap, of course, but many divergent ideas were presented about every idea. Some coaches-in-training planned to forbid cross training other than pool running. Others wanted trainees to run 18/20/22/24 as a marathon build up. Neither of these sounded like great ideas to me, but they seemed to find it workable. Some individuals had strong reactions to ideas presented and were willing to fight over the supremacy of their ideas. Others were open to learning and were flexible in their ideas. If you’re looking for a coach, find one who believes what you believe, or whose ideas sound feasible and reasonable to you. Don’t be afraid to interview coaches to find one whose ideas are compatible with yours? Not sure what the best training strategy is ok? That’s ok! Find a coach who seems interested in you, and who seems open to your ideas. They’ll lead you when it comes to running strategy, but be sure that you and your coach are compatible. Strong goodness of fit will lead to happier training and better results for you from a coach who understands YOU.

Hearing the coaches-in-training talk about developing training plans based on their strongly held beliefs about what works *for them* was a surprise. I’ve always been a bit of a science nerd. I read a great deal of literature about the science of running and have let the science dictate my own training. I usually try training plans myself before asking a client to run that plan. I study the literature and read the books – I believe the science and value the science over my own experience.

Finally, it’s clear to me that people love running. The coaches-in-training were passionate, engaged, and vocal about their belief systems. It was wonderful to be in the company of people who love running as much as I do.

Summer running

Race Review: Mystic Half Marathon

Here’s the latest from my brother on the run, his take on a recent half marathon.

Race Review – Mystic Half Marathon: The Spectator Version

It has been a long time since I have put together an update for Dr.Rachel and this is in part due to my running dropping off some.  I had been skipping runs and avoiding working out for the better part of a month.  After setting a new 10K record in May, I had stopped running to let a sore foot heal and get some work done in the garden.

The closest I came to running was attending the Mystic (CT) Half Marathon as a spectator.

Mystic Half Marathon

After an exciting ride to the race event, complete with 911 call for a vehicle accident that happened in front of us, we arrived at the Mystic Village just in time for check-in.  The freeway exit to the parking lot was crowded and a bit chaotic.  The traffic split in a Y only to circle the parking lots and reach the same end destination.  While the parking could have been easier, we were able to get a great spot and unload.  Dr.Rachel bolted off to check in for pacing while my wife and I wandered Mystic.  There was a small expo set up with a decent amount of people milling about and enjoying the pleasant morning weather.  Announcements were easily heard and when the runners started to line up, the wife and I found a hill to watch the event.

I really though the launch worked well – racers split on two sides of a median and then combined at the start line.  From our 100 ft view, it seemed like the race start went off without a hitch and was well organized.  We had joined a number spectators across the road and had a great view.  Afterwards, we treated ourselves to breakfast and coffee because, hell, we weren’t running.

Having thought ahead, we had taken a camera phone picture of the race course.  This helped us to locate a few locations to watch the event unfold.  After breakfast, we wandered through the rest of Mystic and to the 6.5-7 mile markers.  This was hard to find actually and several of the crossing guards couldn’t direct us to the right intersection.  Luckily, a race volunteer was able to help us reach the 7 mile marker as the first male was coming through.  This was a great viewing spot for us and there was a decent crowd to cheer on the runners.

After watching Dr.Rachel pass by, we headed directly to the finish line.  This was a quarter mile walk for us and 6 mile run for the racers.  We win again!  With our chairs and snacks, we watched as the runners crossed the finish line – again, this was set up well and we had no trouble finding a location to sit.

The star of the day was a race volunteer at the finish line.  We lost count of how many runners he helped. Whenever a runner was struggling, he ran out to them, grabbed their hand, and then ran through the finish line with them.  It was incredible and he continued to do this until the very last runner finished the race.  In all, he probably ran farther that day than any of the race registrants but never lost his energy or enthusiasm for helping the racers.  It was truly awesome to watch.

The post-race events were a mild celebration and again seemed to be well done.  While I cannot speak to the medals or course, this race was a lot of fun for spectators.  My wife and I enjoyed our time at Mystic and would come back to watch the race again.

Running Safety

Lately, the news has been filled with cases of runners in bad situations –interactions with motorists that went poorly and stories of serious harm seem more common. In the majority of situations, runners have done everything they could to avoid harm, but we can never be too careful. Here are some of my favorite safety tips.

First, stay alert to your surroundings. I know many runners enjoy running with music piped directly to their ears through a variety of noise-cancelling headphones. It is safest to run without music, fully able to hear the world around you. If you must run with music, consider leaving one headphone out of your ear and keep the volume to the lowest possible level. This will enable you to hear things going on around you, and help you stay alert for dangers that may be difficult to see. You’ll also be a good running citizen when you can hear the instructions and prompts of those around you.

Run against traffic when on the roads, or on sidewalks when available. By facing oncoming traffic, you can observe the driving habits of cars near you. You can also react more quickly to danger you see coming.

Look both ways before crossing streets (and train tracks) and make sure the driver of the oncoming car acknowledges your right of way before entering the roadway. You may have the right of way, but you still need to obey traffic signals that apply to pedestrians. Cross only in designated crosswalks and be courteous of drivers. Consider using hand signals or pointing in the direction you wish to go. This lets motorists know where you’re headed next.

Wear bright clothing and clothing with reflective details for dusk and dawn runs. If you must run in very low light, wear a headlamp, or a vest with flashing front and rear lights. Vests with built-in LED lighting are inexpensive and easy to find on the internet. Wearing one if you must run in low light will make you significantly more visible to others.

Carry or wear identification. I use a RoadID, a small wrist band (also available as a shoe tag, ankle band, and comfort wristband on RoadID.com) that includes my basic information. At minimum, include your name, date of birth, and the contact number of someone who can help in the event you are medically incapacitated. I have a medical condition, so I’ve paid extra to obtain a RoadID with a special code that enables first responders to access my medical information online in the event I’m unable to speak for myself. In a pinch, you can write this information on the inside of your shoe.

Carry your cell phone, and a small amount of cash. You never know when you might need a ride, a tasty beverage, or a donut mid-run.

Vary your running routes. Run in familiar areas if possible, but try to avoid taking the same route over and over again. Make sure someone knows where you are going and what time you will be home. I share this information with a loved one or fellow runner (who knows this is important). There are also several run tracking apps available that provide real time tracking for runners to be shared with individuals you identify. Among the most popular are the RoadID app and RunSafe. Both have alerts that can be customized for use in the event of an emergency. Run with someone when you can, or in populated areas.

RoadID app

Be cautious about where and how you post your routes on social media, including run tracking apps. If you run often enough, you’ll be tempted to start tracking your runs with GPS and posting them to Gamin Connect, Strava, Nike Plus, or some similar social sharing site. Be sure that your security settings are at least somewhat private, or don’t post runs that start or end at your house. Protect your personal information. Be wary about posting routes on other social media sites if your privacy settings are loose.

Be nice to other people. Avoid verbal altercations. Mind your manners and be a good citizen.

Carry something that makes noise, or practice whistling. You may need to get someone’s attention, or alert wildlife to your presence. Being able to make a loud noise is good.

While we can’t fully protect ourselves from the unknown, we can all take basic steps to reduce risks while still enjoying the sport we love. I hope that you stay safe out there.